Europe
6:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Euro-Courts Blasted Over Al-Qaida Suspect's Release

Britons are in an uproar over a judge's decision to release a Muslim preacher suspected of al-Qaida links. The British government wanted to deport him to Jordan, where he's been convicted on terrorism charges, but European courts won't allow that because the convictions were based on evidence obtained by torture. NPR's Phil Reeves tells host Scott Simon that the case has stirred up resentment.

Economy
6:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Warm Weather Easing Local Budgets

Temperatures have been above normal in Chicago this winter, saving the city's snow removal budget millions of dollars.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

In January of last year, snow blanketed more than 42 percent of the country. Last month, it was just under 13 percent. The warm weather has lowered our heating bills and created a bit of an economic boost.

After two brutally long winters, the temperatures this year have been positively balmy. In the Washington, D.C., area, they've hovered in the 50s for much of the past two and a half months. Area landscapers, whose schedules are usually pretty lean this time of year, are busier. Take Chuck Dod Landscaping, which is building a stone wall in the backyard of a home in Mclean, Va.

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Animals
6:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

The Zebra's Stripes, A Personal No-Fly Zone

Scientists in Hungary and Sweden say they've found an answer to the age-old question of how the zebra got its stripes. It turns out the pattern may have evolved to repel Africa's biting flies. The researchers discovered this by placing models of patterned zebras next to models of their plainer cousins, horses, and measuring how many flies ended up on each one. Host Scott Simon has more.

Religion
6:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Boston's Neighborhood Parishes May Become Branch Offices

The Archdiocese of Boston is taking a business approach to its problem of too many parishes, too few priests and not enough parishioners. It plans to merge parishes into clusters and placing them under one pastor. It will eliminate dozens of parish jobs for lay people and take away local control of a church's budget and religious education program. The plan is being met with considerable pushback from priests and parishioners. Monica Brady-Myerov of member station WBUR reports.

NPR Story
6:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Just You, Your Dogs And The Yukon Sled Race

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Nearly two dozen dog sledding teams set out a week ago on a thousand mile race over some of the most remote territory in North America. The mushers have reached the halfway mark in the race. They're now in the Canadian Yukon. And Emily Schwing of member station KUAC has been following the race since its start in Fairbanks, Alaska.

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NPR Story
6:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Lawyers Share The Bench In Terrorism Cases

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Krista joined KAZU in 2007.  She is an award winning journalist with more than a decade of broadcast experience.  Her stories have won regional Edward R. Murrow Awards and honors from the Northern California Radio and Television News Directors Association.  Prior to working at KAZU, Krista reported in Sacramento for Capital Public Radio and at television stations in Iowa.  Like KAZU listeners, Krista appreciates the in-depth, long form stories that are unique to public radio. She's pleased to continue that tradition in the Monterey Bay Area.

Latin America
4:14 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Sports Journalism Is The Goooaal At Argentine School

In sports-crazy Argentina, sports journalism schools have cropped up to train aspiring reporters and broadcasters. Here, Argentine national soccer team coach Sergio Batista arrives for a press conference in Cordoba, Argentina, last year.
Antonio Scorza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 9:46 am

Every day, from early morning until late at night, the Superior School of Sports Journalism in Buenos Aires is packed. And most of its 600 students hope to spend their working lives covering sports.

For years, Roberto Bermudez has been teaching in the ornate mansion that houses the school.

"Many have been frustrated athletes, whom I always tell, 'Here we don't make athletes, we make journalists. You have the opportunity to be a journalist,' " Bermudez says.

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Author Interviews
4:13 am
Sat February 11, 2012

In A StoryCorps Booth, Love Is 'All There Is'

iStockphoto.com

Dave Isay begins his new book with a quote from co-worker Lillie Love, whose name resonates deeply with his latest project. Shortly before she died in 2010, Love said, "Love is all there is ... When you take your last breath, you remember the people you love, how much love you inspired and how much love you gave."

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Space
4:12 am
Sat February 11, 2012

A Real Estate Deal That Spans The Earth

The Jamesburg Earth Station closed in 2002, but the 10-story satellite dish still stands tall.
Courtesy of Bert Aronson

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 9:46 am

For sale: 160 acres of rolling hills in California perfect for a vineyard, cattle ranch or communication with outer space.

To understand how Silicon Valley businessman Jeffrey Bullis ended up owning the Jamesburg Earth Station — a former telecommunications center with a 10-story satellite dish — you have to think back to 2004.

The real estate market was booming. Bullis was visiting a friend in Carmel Valley on California's Central Coast, where homes can still sell for millions.

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