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3:18 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Teen Sexual Assault: Where Does The Conversation Start?

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 4:59 pm

The narrative has become all too familiar: accusations of sexual assault, followed by bullying of the victims on social media.

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The Two-Way
3:09 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Janos Starker, A Master Of The Cello, Dies At 88

Hungarian-born American cellist Janos Starker died Sunday at 88. Starker's career included more than 165 recordings, as well as decades of teaching.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 8:24 am

Cellist Janos Starker has died at 88, ending a life and career that saw him renowned for his skills as a soloist, his prodigious work with orchestras, and his commitment to teaching. Starker was born in Budapest in 1924; his path to becoming an international star included surviving life in a Nazi labor camp.

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Music
2:31 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

New Cuban Sounds Rooted In Tradition From 'Global Village'

The Miami group Tiempo Libre combines hip-hop, R&B, rock and pan-Latin sounds to create a distinctive version of Cuban party music known as timba.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:38 pm

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Media
2:27 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Anti-Drug PSAs: Do They Work?

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:38 pm

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History
2:21 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

First He Invented The Phone. Then, Bell Left A Voice Message

Though the quality of the sound recordings is poor, we know what Alexander Graham Bell was saying because he left transcripts.
Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 2:28 pm

As the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell is credited with bringing countless voices to our ears. And now, for the first time, here he is imploring us to hear his own voice:

The sound is scratchy. You have to strain to decipher it, but the words are clear. They're from Bell's lips, recorded in 1885 but unveiled just last week by the Smithsonian.

"It lets us know what the past was really like. It fills in a gap for people," says Shari Stout, collections manager at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

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