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The Two-Way
4:14 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

Mormon Church Launches Website On 'Same-Sex Attraction'

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Douglas C. Pizac AP

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 10:46 pm

The Mormon Church has a new website to clarify its position on "same-sex attraction" and to reach out to all of its members, including gays and lesbians, "with love and understanding."

The launching of mormonsandgays.org follows persistent criticism of Mormon involvement in California's ballot measure banning gay marriage, NPR's Howard Berkes reports. Berkes tells our Newscast Desk that scrutiny continued through Mitt Romney's campaign for president.

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Food
3:58 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

In A Family's Lost Cookie, Lots Of Love, And Molasses

NPR's Lost Recipe project helped Pavlos re-create her great-grandmother's jumble cookies.
Courtesy of Nancy Baggett

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 12:09 pm

Frederick Rickmeyer, our hats are off to you and your note-taking ways.

Shortly after the turn of the last century, Frederick started documenting his wife's recipes on the blank memoranda pages of a cookbook. He included titles like My Wife's Own Original Spanish Bun and comments like "as good as ever," along with the ingredients and dates.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

In Doha, Philippines Negotiator Delivers Emotional Plea For Climate Change Action

Residents carry a relative's coffin along a muddy road in the town of New Bataan, compostela province on Thursday. Nearly 200,000 people are homeless and more than 300 dead after the Philippines suffered its worst typhoon this year.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 4:14 pm

This kind of thing rarely happens. But today during the United Nation's COP 18 climate change conference in Doha, the lead negotiator for the Philippines broke down.

He delivered an emotional plea for action on the issue of climate change that was made even more dramatic because his country is just now starting to pick up the pieces from a typhoon that has killed hundreds.

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It's All Politics
3:56 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

DeMint's Exit Creates Political Ripples, Raises Questions For Tea Party

Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., speaks to the media after a Republican caucus luncheon last year. He's joined by (from left): Sen. John Thune, R-S.D.; Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.; Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.; and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 6:51 am

When Thursday dawned in Washington, some things seemed certain: The fiscal cliff fight would continue; the National Christmas Tree would be aglow by evening, and Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina would continue to be the Senate's most important Tea Party voice.

So much for Washington certainties.

With his surprise announcement that he was exiting the Senate to head the Heritage Foundation think tank, a job that paid his predecessor $1 million annually, DeMint brought to an end his role as the Tea Party's godfather in the Senate.

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U.S.
3:53 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

Crime-Ridden Camden To Dump City Police Force

Camden City Police Chief Scott Thomson says he has shooting investigations "backlogging like burglary cases." Half of his force was laid off last year, and the city says expensive benefits in the police union contract are preventing them from hiring more cops.
Alisa Chang NPR

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 5:54 pm

As the New Jersey city of Camden blasts through its all-time-high homicide record — exceeding 60 murders so far this year — city officials have an unusual solution to rising crime: laying off the entire police department.

Year after year, Camden ranks as one of the most dangerous cities in America based on several categories: murders, rapes, assaults and robberies. But the city says it's too poor to hire more police officers. So it's dissolving its municipal police force and letting the county set up a bigger, cheaper force to replace it.

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