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Million Dollar Donors
7:24 pm
Sat March 31, 2012

A Wyoming Millionaire Places His Faith In Santorum

Foster Friess introduces Rick Santorum at the 2012 CPAC Conference in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 10 wearing a sweater vest embroidered with the candidate's name.
Ron Sachs CNP DPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 30, 2012 2:02 pm

After a series of primary wins, Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum showed strong fundraising numbers last month.

But earlier in the contest, the loudest voice promoting the former Pennsylvania senator wasn't the candidate himself. It was Foster Friess, a multimillionaire who was the main funder of a pro-Santorum superPAC.

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The Impact of War
7:17 pm
Sat March 31, 2012

Home Front: Soldiers Become Civilians Again

Briefings are part of the demobilization process that the 182nd Infantry Regiment must go through at Camp Atterbury in Columbus, Ind.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 8:33 pm

We first met the soldiers of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard about a week ago, on an airport tarmac. They had just landed in the United States after wrapping up a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:50 pm
Sat March 31, 2012

Babies Take Longer To Come Out Than They Did In Grandma's Day

Fifty years ago, the typical first-time mother in the U.S. took about four hours to give birth. These days, women labor about 6 1/2 hours.
Carsten/Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 4:51 pm

The typical first-time mother takes 6 1/2 hours to give birth these days. Her counterpart 50 years ago labored for barely four hours.

That's the striking conclusion of a new federal study that compared nearly 140,000 births from two time periods.

One big implication: Today's obstetricians may be rushing to do cesarean sections too soon because they're using an out-of-date yardstick for how long a "normal" labor should take.

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Author Interviews
3:40 pm
Sat March 31, 2012

Fight For Klimt Portrait A Fight To Reclaim History

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 3:43 pm

In Germany, a federal court has ruled that the German Historical Museum in Berlin must return a rare collection of handcrafted posters to the son of the original owner. The posters were seized by the Nazis from a Jewish art collector in the 1930s.

The case is one of dozens in recent years in which art stolen by the Nazis from Jews has been returned to descendants.

The most famous case involved Gustav Klimt's masterpiece, the Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer. The golden, shimmering painting of the high society hostess became known as Austria's Mona Lisa.

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Judging The Health Care Law
3:16 pm
Sat March 31, 2012

The Individual Mandate's Growth In Unpopularity

Protesters chant and hold a copy of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution in front of Supreme Court in Washington as the court concluded three days of hearing arguments on the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 5:08 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this week over key aspects of President Obama's health care law, including the expansion of Medicaid and whether the court even had the right to hear the case. But the core of the challenge mounted against the Affordable Care Act hinges upon its individual mandate, which requires almost every American to have or buy health insurance.

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