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Politics
6:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

The Contraception Compromise Plays Out Politically

Originally published on Sun February 12, 2012 8:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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Presidential Race
6:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Conservative Straw Poll Gives Romney A Nod

Originally published on Sun February 12, 2012 8:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Mitt Romney also got an unofficial endorsement from Republican activists yesterday, as the Conservative Political Action Conference came to a close. He won the organization's straw poll with 38 percent of the vote. Former senator Rick Santorum came in second place with 31 percent. Former House speaker Newt Gingrich was third with 15 percent and Ron Paul came in fourth with 12 percent.

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The Salt
4:55 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Battling The Bottle: Students And Industry Face Off Over Water

Humbolt State University

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Latin America
4:19 am
Sun February 12, 2012

'Who Rules In Honduras?': A Coup's Lasting Impact

Zelaya's supporters rallied after the coup that ousted him in June 2009.
Esteban Felix AP

Originally published on Sun February 12, 2012 3:52 pm

The second of a two-part series about the roots of violence in Honduras.

Honduras is a major stop for drug traffickers; corruption is rampant. Many experts say things got markedly worse after the 2009 coup that ousted democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya. The fallout of that coup continues today.

'The Shooting Started Around 5:20 a.m.'

When it comes to coups and dictators, Latin America has a difficult past. Today the region is largely democratic. Dictators and coups are supposed to be a thing of the past.

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The Picture Show
4:16 am
Sun February 12, 2012

What Greek Austerity Looks Like

Nurse Stella Trivizaki stands in an abandoned locker room at Asklypeio Public Hospital in Athens, Greece.
Eirini Vourloumis

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:02 am

Half-Greek and half-Indonesian, photojournalist Eirini Vourloumis moved back to her hometown of Athens, Greece, in 2010 to cover the economic crisis. She found her country unrecognizable.

For one thing, she was struck by the surge of immigrants.

"When I was growing up it was very rare to see a non-Greek anywhere," she says.

Once-docile areas in Athens now seethe with crime, yet Vourloumis says the most dramatic shift for Greeks has been psychological.

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