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Business
2:00 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Acorn Media Gains Rights To Agatha Christie

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And this morning's last word in business is: killer deal.

That's what Acorn Media may feel it's landed. Acorn distributes British TV series in the U.S., and it's now acquired a controlling interest in the estate of Agatha Christie. The late author of murder mysteries has sold billions of books. Those include the classic detective series Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot.

(SOUNDBITE OF AGATHA CHRISTIE MOVIE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as Hercule Poirot) However, there is someone in this room who denied to him this pleasure.

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Business
2:00 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Bernanke: Economic Growth Is Uneven, Modest

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a prognosis from Ben Bernanke.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is back on Capitol Hill today, for a second day of testimony. He's speaking to Senators one day after he told House members that the economic recovery is, quote, "uneven and modest." He showed no sign of what his predecessor once called irrational exuberance.

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Theater
10:01 pm
Wed February 29, 2012

'Carrie' Creators Resurrect A Legendary Flop

Molly Ranson plays the title role in the off-Broadway reworking of Carrie, directed by Stafford Arima and written by Lawrence D. Cohen, with lyrics by Dean Pitchford and music by Michael Gore.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 10:18 am

Broadway history is littered with flop musicals — but if some shows are bombs, then Carrie, based on Stephen King's best-selling 1974 novel, was kind of a nuclear bomb.

The story of a teenager with telekinetic powers who wreaks bloody havoc on her small Maine town had already been successfully adapted as a film starring Sissy Spacek in 1976. But as a musical?

Frank Rich was theater critic for The New York Times when the show opened in April 1988. He called it a musical wreck that "expires with fireworks like the Hindenburg."

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Education
10:01 pm
Wed February 29, 2012

To Get Kids To Class, LA Softens Its Hard Line

Los Angeles Police Department officers detain students in 2010 during a sweep for truants in the San Pedro neighborhood.
Brad Graverson Torrance Daily Breeze

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 6:52 pm

Los Angeles is easing its stance on truancy. For the past decade, a tough city ordinance slapped huge fines on students for even one instance of skipping school or being late, but the Los Angeles City Council is changing that law to focus on helping students get to class because it turns out those harsh fines were backfiring.

Two years ago, Nabil Romero, a young Angeleno with a thin black mustache, was running late to his first period at a public high school on LA's Westside.

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National Security
10:01 pm
Wed February 29, 2012

In Mock Village, A New Afghan Mission Takes Shape

Lt. Col. Mark Schmitt, who will be among a group of U.S. military trainers heading to Afghanistan soon, calls out orders during a mock attack on the model Afghan village at the U.S. military base in Fort Polk, La.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:59 am

At the Fort Polk military base in the pine forests of central Louisiana, the Army has created a miniature version of Afghanistan — with mock villages and American soldiers working alongside Afghan role-players.

This is the training ground for a new American approach in Afghanistan as the U.S. begins to look ahead to the goal of bringing home the U.S. forces by the end of 2014. The idea is that Afghan forces have to be good enough to defend their country against the Taliban, and to make that happen, the U.S. Army is creating small U.S. training teams at Fort Polk.

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