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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Who Is Kim Jong Un? Who Really Knows?

North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency distributed this photo of Kim Jong Un on Sept. 23.
hand-out AFP/Getty Images

It's been two years since Kim Jong Un effectively became North Korea's "Great Successor" and heir to the seat of power in the communist nation run by a family dynasty — a dynasty that began with his grandfather, Kim Il Sung (the "Great Leader") and continued with his father, Kim Jong Il (the "Dear Leader").

But in that time about the only new thing we know is that he's two years older and now thought to be in his late 20s. And, that he appears about to become at least the titular head of an impoverished nation that threatens its richer neighbor to the south with nuclear weapons

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Asia
8:03 am
Mon December 19, 2011

North Korea Faces Choices In Post-Kim Jong Il World

What's next now that Kim Jong Il is dead?

Kim, whose official age was 69 but who actually was 70, died Saturday of a heart attack, according to North Korean state media.

He leaves behind a pretty much officially designated heir, his son Kim Jong Un, whose age is about 29. The young man has been given exalted titles including full general but has little experience compared with what his father had under his belt when Kim Jong Il's own father and predecessor, Kim Il Sung, died in 1994.

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It's All Politics
7:04 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Two Weeks Before Caucuses, Many Iowans Still Wavering

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann visits with Pastor Marvin Smith III at the Harvest Baptist Church on Dec. 18 in Fort Dodge, Iowa.
Eric Gay AP

Only two weeks to go until Iowa Republicans head to their caucuses to begin choosing a presidential nominee and NPR's Pam Fessler reports on Monday's Morning Edition that many are still trying to decide who will win their votes.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

More Than 30 Percent Of Americans Arrested By Age 23, Study Says

The arrest of an Occupy DC protester earlier this month in Washington — one type of arrest that would show up in the researchers' numbers.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

There's been a sharp increase in recent decades in the number of young Americans who report they've been arrested at least once, researchers report in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

While in the mid-1960s about 22 percent of Americans reported having been arrested by the time they turned 23, researchers estimate that the "prevalence rate" for arrests by that age now lies "between 30.2 percent and 41.4 percent."

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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Top Stories: Kim Jong Il's Death, Philippines Disaster, Payroll Tax Impasse

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 6:20 am

Good morning.

The major story of the past 12 hours or so, as we've been reporting, is the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

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