Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La. made an emotional return to Congress Thursday morning for the first time since he was shot during a baseball practice in June.

"You have no idea how great this feels to be back at work in the people's house," he said, as he addressed a packed House chamber.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended his boss's criticism of NFL players for kneeling in protest during the national anthem, saying Tuesday that President Trump has "free speech rights, too."

Sessions defended Trump's controversial remarks as he criticized college speech policies during an address at the Georgetown University Law Center. "Freedom of thought and speech on the American campus are under attack," he said.

"In this great land," Sessions also said, "the government does not get to tell you what to think or what to say."

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET


Television is intractable in the story of Donald Trump, with his run on reality TV serving as the lead-in to his political rise.

And television's 69th Emmy Awards seemed all about Trump Sunday night.

Former Sen. Pete Domenici, who championed balanced budgets, nuclear energy and parity for mental illnesses in health insurance during his six terms in office, died Wednesday morning in Albuquerque, N.M.

The New Mexico Republican was 85. His death was confirmed by his son Pete Domenici Jr.'s law office and announced on the Senate floor by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who also tweeted the news:

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