Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

The Cleveland Indians will be removing "Chief Wahoo," the bright red caricature of a Native American the team uses as a logo, from players' caps and uniforms starting in 2019.

The divisive logo, which has been publicly protested as a racist and offensive image for decades, will remain on official merchandise available for purchase by fans.

"The team must maintain a retail presence so that MLB and the Indians can keep ownership of the trademark," The Associated Press reports.

After a global fundraiser, a plea to Pakistan's Army for help, an ill-timed snowstorm and a daring overnight climb by a team of volunteer rescuers, French mountaineer Elisabeth Revol has been rescued from Nanga Parbat, one of the world's tallest and most dangerous mountains.

But her Polish climbing partner Tomasz "Tomek" Mackiewicz, whose life she was attempting to save had to be left behind.

John Feeley, the U.S. ambassador to Panama, is stepping down from his post, citing irreconcilable differences with the Trump administration, Reuters reports.

Simon Bramhall, the British surgeon who branded his initials onto patients' livers during transplant surgeries at least twice, has been ordered to do 120 hours of community service and pay £10,000 (more than $13,600).

Bramhall pleaded guilty in December to two counts of assault for branding his patients.

Two 15-year-old boys have been sentenced to 5 years of probation over the livestreamed sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl in Chicago last March.

As NPR reported at the time, the girl, then a freshmen in high school, was sexually assaulted by as many as six different boys and men. Video of the attack was streamed on Facebook Live. Dozens of people watched, none of whom called police to report the rape.

Pages