Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

French Court Charges Strauss-Kahn With 'Aggravated Pimping'

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, leaves after a hearing before an investigation committee on capital flight at the French Senate in June.
Martin Bureau AFP/Getty Images

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former head of the International Monetary Fund who was forced to resign amid allegations of sexual misconduct in the U.S., faces charges of "aggravated pimping" before a court in his native France.

A trial date has not been set.

Strauss-Kahn, 64, stepped down as head of the IMF in 2011 after he was accused of sexually assaulting a New York hotel maid. Although those charges were later dropped, they derailed the politician's plans to run for the French presidency.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Fri July 26, 2013

North Korea Still Gets Propaganda Mileage Out Of U.S. Spy Ship

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 11:03 am

North Korea's most famous museum exhibit, the captured American spy ship USS Pueblo, has been painted and polished for display as part of Saturday's "Victory Day" ceremonies marking the 60th anniversary of the armistice that ended hostilities in the Korean War.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Egypt Opens Murder, Conspiracy Investigation Against Morsi

Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi attend a Friday rally in Cairo.
Ahmad Gharabli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 6:54 pm

Egyptian prosecutors have opened an investigation into ousted President Mohammed Morsi, who they suspect of conspiracy and murder, raising tensions as both Islamists and supporters of newly installed military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi turn out for street protests.

The surprise announcement of the investigation against Morsi, who was removed in a July 3 coup, stem from a 2011 prison break in which Morsi escaped and at least 14 guards were killed. Hamas gunmen are said to have led the attack at Wadi el-Natroun prison, an allegation the militant group has denied.

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The Two-Way
8:07 am
Fri July 26, 2013

If You Think The French President Is 'Stupide,' Just Say So

France's President Francois Hollande. His predecessor, Nicolas Sarkozy, reportedly thinks he's "a ridiculous little fat man."
Pool AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 10:27 am

The French are famous for their insults, but traditionally they haven't taken it well when the target is the president of the republic.

A vote in parliament on Thursday has changed that. For the first time in 130 years, it's now legal to say how you really feel about the French leader.

So, if you think that French President Francois Hollande is "a ridiculous little fat man who dyes his hair," as Nicolas Sarkozy reportedly said (in private) of his successor, you're free to say so — in public.

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The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Holder Seeks Continued Oversight Of Texas Election Laws

Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the National Urban League annual conference on Thursday in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke Associated Press

Attorney General Eric Holder says the Justice Department will ask a federal court to subject Texas to the same kind of scrutiny that was required of it by a section of the Voting Rights Act struck down last month by the Supreme Court.

In Shelby County v. Holder, the high court rescinded Section 5 of the 1965 act, which required several states including Texas that had a history of voter discrimination to get "pre-clearance" from the federal government before changing their election laws.

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