Tom Huizenga

Tom Huizenga is a music producer, reporter, and blogger for NPR Music.

He is a regular contributor of stories about classical music to NPR's news programs and hosts NPR's classical music blog Deceptive Cadence. He is the classical music reviewer for All Things Considered.

Joining NPR in 1999, Huizenga spent seven years as a producer, writer, and editor for NPR's Peabody Award-winning daily classical music show Performance Today and for the programs SymphonyCast and World of Opera.

He's produced live concerts, including a radio broadcast of Gershwin's Porgy & Bess from Washington National Opera at the Kennedy Center and NPR's first classical music webcast from New York's (Le) Poisson Rouge, featuring the Emerson String Quartet. He's also produced videos of musicians playing in unlikely venues, such as mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato singing at the historic Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village and cellist Alisa Weilerstein at the Baltimore Aquarium. He's written and produced radio specials, like A Choral Christmas With Stile Antico, broadcast on stations around the country.

Huizenga's radio career began at the University of Michigan, where he hosted opera, jazz, free-form, and experimental radio programs at Ann Arbor's WCBN. As a student in the Ethnomusicology department, Huizenga studied and performed traditional court music from Indonesia. He also studied English Literature and voice, while writing for the university's newspaper.

Huizenga took his love of music and broadcasting to New Mexico, where he served as music director for NPR member station KRWG, in Las Cruces, and taught radio production at New Mexico State University.

In his spare time, Huizenga writes about music for the Washington Post and overloads on concerts and movies.

Cecilia Bartoli has a passion for musical archaeology: "I am the Indiana Jones of classical," she says jokingly to All Things Considered host Robert Siegel.

Bartoli rummages through music history to uncover forgotten opera composers deserving of her detailed and dramatic performances. Her new album, Mission, introduces her most recent "find," the late-17th-century Italian Agostino Steffani.

Some people are intimidated by the vastness of classical music. And while the prospect of more than 1,000 years of hits to consider may be daunting, just think instead of how many musical journeys of discovery can be made.

One hundred years ago, a musical marvel was born. She grew up in a tiny hamlet in the North of England, but made a huge impression on the world of classical music.

"Unique" is an overused word, yet it truly fits the sound of Kathleen Ferrier's voice. If you've never heard it, prepare to be amazed — stop reading now and click on the link below.

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