All Things Considered

NPR's afternoon radio newsmagazine, All things Considered presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is available on Saturday and Sunday.
 

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  • Sundays at 6 p.m.

Local Underwriters

Atwood, Malone, Turner & Sabin

Permian Ford, Lincoln & Mercury

Goodwill Industries

Maddox, Holloman & Kirksey, P.C.

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Music Interviews
2:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Robert Johnson And Pablo Casals' Game-Changers Turn 75

Spanish musician and composer Pablo Casals, playing the cello in 1936.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 1:45 pm

Nov. 23, 1936, was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, each stepped up to a microphone and began to play. One was a cello prodigy who had performed for the queen of Spain; the other was a guitar player in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on that day, Pablo Casals and Robert Johnson each made recordings that would change music history.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Target Shoppers Discuss Store's Black Friday Hours

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 6:14 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

When the holidays roll around, how much shopping is too much shopping? Hordes already pile to the stores before the sun is up on the morning of so-called Black Friday. This year, Target, Wal-Mart and some other retailers are opening even earlier - midnight, as Thursday turns to Friday. And some workers are protesting.

NPR's Chris Arnold waded into the retail trenches to get the latest.

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Law
6:09 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Government Whistle-Blowers Gain New Advocate

Carolyn Lerner is the new head of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.
Peter Krogh Courtesy of U.S. Office of Special Counsel

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is one of those small corners of the government with an important mission: It's supposed to help protect federal whistle-blowers and shield civil service workers from politics.

But during the Bush years, the office was engulfed in scandal. It was raided by FBI agents, and its chief was indicted for obstructing justice.

It's into that unsettled environment that the new leader, Carolyn Lerner, arrived five months ago. And good government groups say she's already taking the office in new directions.

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Planet Money
2:17 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

The National Debt: What The Left And Right Agree On

Supercommittee members, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona and Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 9:15 am

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

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Economy
4:20 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Obama Blames Republicans For Debt Panel's Failure

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 7:27 pm

President Obama Monday put the blame for the supercommittee's failure squarely on congressional Republicans — and their unwillingness to consider higher taxes on the wealthy. Obama also threatened to veto any effort to escape from the automatic spending cuts agreed to in August without a balanced plan to reduce the deficit. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Scott Horsley for more.

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