All Things Considered

NPR's afternoon radio newsmagazine, All things Considered presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is available on Saturday and Sunday.
 

  •  Saturdays at 6 p.m.
  • Sundays at 6 p.m.

Local Underwriters

Atwood, Malone, Turner & Sabin

Permian Ford, Lincoln & Mercury

Goodwill Industries

Maddox, Holloman & Kirksey, P.C.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51828a0de1c84b9b3510ab6c|518289fee1c84b9b3510ab52

Pages

Media
2:53 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Is It Ethical? Universities Pay Newspaper For Coverage

Copies of The Orange County Register slide through the presses. The Register is the country's 20th most-read daily, with a circulation of about 285,000.
Grant Slater KPCC

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:11 pm

This spring, readers of The Orange County Register in Southern California started seeing much more coverage of local universities. What they probably did not know is that the stories are paid for by the schools. Depending on whom you ask, it is either a smart way to bring in revenue, or a serious breach of journalism ethics.

Read more
The Salt
11:29 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Mastering A Sea Monster: From Greece, A Lesson In Grilling Octopus

For octopus flesh to be tender enough to grill, it must be dried in the sun at least one full day.
Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 1:09 pm

The Greeks have been eating octopus since ancient times, and it's still on the menu of the country's many psarotavernes, or fish taverns.

On the islands, where the catch is often fresh, octopus is grilled over charcoal, seasoned with fresh lemon and served with ouzo. Friends and families often share this special summer meze during a hot day at the beach.

Read more
The Salt
5:04 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

How Circadian Rhythms Give Vegetables A Healthy Boost

Researchers at Rice University conducted lab studies using light-dark cycles to try to coax more beneficial compounds out of fruits and vegetables.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Just as we have internal clocks that help regulate the systems in our bodies, fruit and vegetable plants have circadian rhythms, too.

And a new study published in Current Biology finds there may be a way to boost some of the beneficial compounds in plants by simulating the light-dark cycle after crops are harvested.

So, how does it work?

Read more
History
4:42 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

The Desegregation Of Birmingham's Golf Courses

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. All this week, I'm in Birmingham, Alabama, where the city is in the midst of commemorating the 50th anniversary of the tumultuous and influential civil rights protests that occurred here. One place that might not come to mind when you think about this period is the golf course.

Read more
Book Reviews
3:47 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

'Crazy Rich Asians': Lives Of The .0001 Percent

The Venetian Macao, the world's biggest casino by gaming tables, opened to the public in 2007.
Mike Clarke AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 4:42 pm

It's impossible to open the newspaper or turn on the TV these days without seeing some outrageous example of new Asian money. From a castle modeled on Versailles in Changsha to billion-dollar penthouses in Bombay to the Marina Bay Sands casino in Singapore, with its seven celebrity-chef restaurants, the inescapable truth looms before us: We Asians are not just rich but also, frankly, somewhat crazy.

Read more

Pages