All Things Considered

NPR's afternoon radio newsmagazine, All things Considered presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is available on Saturday and Sunday.
 

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  • Sundays at 6 p.m.

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Music Reviews
2:35 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Samuel Yirga: A Prodigy Reviving Ethiopian Jazz

Yirga's debut album is called Guzo.
Courtesy of Worldisc

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 1:50 pm

Samuel Yirga is a pianist from Ethiopia. A 20-something prodigy, Yirga is too young to have experienced the Ethio-jazz movement of the early 1970s, but he has absorbed its music deeply — and plenty more as well. With his debut release, Guzo, or "Journey," Yirga both revives and updates Ethiopian jazz.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:04 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Max Richter Recomposes 'The Four Seasons'

Composer Max Richter's new album takes on Vivaldi's Four Seasons.
Erik Weiss Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 3:57 pm

Composer Max Richter has done a brave thing for any artist in any medium: He's messed with a classic, specifically, Vivaldi's four violin concertos known as The Four Seasons. He has a new album simply titled Recomposed by Max Richter: Vivaldi, The Four Seasons.

Richter says that as a child, he loved The Four Seasons. But as he grew older, that passion faded.

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All Tech Considered
1:57 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Parent Over Shoulder: Apps Help Mom Snoop Online, But Should She?

As more teens get mobile devices, parents are using apps to track their every tweet and post.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 3:57 pm

When his teenage son ventured into social media, Virginia father Mike Robinson wanted to make sure he could keep tabs on him. Robinson works in IT, so he rigged a surveillance system that works no matter what kind of device either of them is on.

"It's sort of like a version of remote desktop that enables you to run the program kind of silently in the background," Robinson says.

One day, checking in from his iPhone, Robinson discovered that his son had come across an adult meet-up site on Facebook.

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Planet Money
10:05 am
Wed November 21, 2012

Lance Armstrong And The Business Of Doping

Christophe Ena AP

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 3:57 pm

The story of Lance Armstrong's alleged doping is, in part, the story of an astonishing business enterprise — an enterprise that drove what the U.S. anti-doping agency called "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program" cycling has ever seen.

The story of that enterprise starts in 1998, when the Festina cycling team was caught at the Tour de France with a car full of banned drugs. According to author Daniel Coyle, this marked a huge shift in the culture of doping in cycling.

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Law
4:33 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

Scandals Call Into Question Crime Labs' Oversight

Greg Taylor holds up his release papers after he was unanimously exonerated by a three-judge panel in Raleigh, N.C., in 2010. Taylor, who had been in prison since 1993 for murder, is now suing several people who worked at a crime lab, claiming their erroneous findings landed him in jail.
Shawn Rocco AP

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 5:06 pm

Three years ago, a report from the National Academy of Sciences exposed serious problems in the nation's forensic science community. It found not only a lack of peer-reviewed science in the field, but also insufficient oversight in crime laboratories.

Little has changed since that report came out, but concerns are growing as scandals keep surfacing at crime labs across the country.

Critical Errors

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