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Around the Nation
3:09 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Colorado Using Half Of U.S. Wildfire Fighting Resources

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 10:34 am

A massive wildfire near Colorado Springs is threatening thousands of homes and the nearby Air Force Academy. Fire management officials have issued mandatory evacuation orders for more than 30,000 homes. New students are set to arrive at the Air Force Academy on Thursday.

Music
1:26 am
Thu June 28, 2012

The Bajo Quinto: The Instrument That Will Not Go Gently

Don Telesforo next to a bajo quinto, holding a jarana mixteca.
Courtesy of Ruben Luengas

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 10:34 am

Almost 20 years ago, a young student at the National University of Mexico went in search of a very old instrument in the mountains of the southern state of Oaxaca. Today, he has become a leading force in the revival of the instrument called the bajo quinto and the music played on it.

Ruben Luengas was working on a research project at the National School of Music in Mexico City in 1995. He wanted to focus on the music of his hometown, in the Mixtec region of Oaxaca, so he asked his 97-year-old grandmother to tell him about the music played at her wedding.

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The Salt
1:25 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Unlike Chicken And Pork, Beef Still Begins With Small Family Ranches

Barbara and Norman Roux stand in front of cattle pens on their farm outside of Moundridge, Kan., where she has raised cattle for nearly 70 years.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 5:47 pm

In the chicken and pork industries, nearly every aspect of the animals' raising has long been controlled by just a handful of agriculture conglomerates. But the cattle industry is still populated by mom-and-pop operations, at least at the calf-raising level.

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Asia
1:17 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Amid Fierce Debate, Japan To Restart Nuclear Plants

Anti-nuclear activists in front of the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 22. Some 20,000 demonstrators protested against the Japanese government's decision to restart two idle nuclear reactors in western Japan, ending a brief period without any nuclear power generation.
Rie Ishii AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 10:34 am

After taking all 50 of its nuclear reactors offline following a devastating accident last year, Japan is planning to restart the first of two of them in western Fukui prefecture as early as Sunday.

The catastrophe at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in March 2011 forced Japan to scale back plans to aggressively expand its nuclear energy sector. But the highly controversial move to restart the two reactors on the other side of the country is a sign that the nuclear power lobby isn't throwing in the towel yet.

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Movies
10:03 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

In France, A Star Rises From An Oft-Neglected Place

Omar Sy plays Driss in the hit French film The Intouchables. The feel-good movie won numerous awards in France, but has met with a mixed reaction in the U.S.
Thierry Valletoux Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 10:34 am

Frenchman Jean Dujardin may have won this year's Academy Award for best actor for his role in The Artist, but in France he was beat out for the country's most prestigious acting award, the Cesar, by a new acting sensation: The 34-year-old son of African immigrants, Omar Sy.

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