Religion
10:01 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Muslims On Boston Bombings: We're All Disgusted

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we will meet one of this country's most influential tech executives. We'll also hear about his very interesting personal story about how he rose from humble beginnings in Mexico to become one of this country's top leaders in high tech. That's later in the program.

But, first, we want to continue our conversation with three thoughtful Muslim Americans in the wake of the attack on the Boston Marathon and the news that two of the suspects were indeed Muslim.

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Science
10:00 am
Wed April 24, 2013

"Cavemen Cold Case" on Secrets of the Dead airs Wednesday, May 15th at 9 pm

A laboratory study of 49,000 year-old Neanderthal bones discovered in El Sidron, a remote, mountainous region of northern Spain.

A tomb of 49,000 year-old Neanderthal bones discovered in El Sidron, a remote, mountainous region of northern Spain, leads to a compelling investigation to solve a double mystery: How did this group of Neanderthals die? And could the fate of this group help explain Neanderthal extinction? Scientists examine the bones and discover signs that tell a shocking story of how this group may have met their deaths. Some bones bear distinct signs of cannibalism. Was it a result of ritual or hunger? Neanderthal experts are adamant that they were not bloodthirsty brutes.

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Science
9:54 am
Wed April 24, 2013

"Great Zebra Exodus" on Nature airs on Wednesday, May 15th at 7 pm

A herd of zebra stampedes along the Boteti River. Makgadikgadi Pans National Park, Botswana.

When thunderclouds begin to gather over Botswana’s Kalahari each year, 20,000 zebras get itchy feet. As the first fat raindrops hit the dust, southern Africa’s biggest animal migration gets underway. In a never-ending quest for grass and water, the striped herds undertake an annual epic trek across the vast lunar landscape of the Kalahari’s Makgadikgadi Pans. See the story of this spectacular annual migration through the eyes of a single zebra family: a stallion, his three mares and their offspring.

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Economy
9:53 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Help Wanted, But Only Part Time

In today's economy, many people in search of work can only find part-time jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics finds the number of 'involuntary' part-time workers has doubled since 2006. Host Michel Martin talks about what this means for the workplace and the economy, with The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy.

The Two-Way
9:44 am
Wed April 24, 2013

1 Inmate Impregnated 4 Guards At Md. Jail, Prosecutors Say

This may not surprise fans of HBO's The Wire:

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Politics
9:41 am
Wed April 24, 2013

"It's a Free Country", Pt. 2 of Constitution USA with Peter Sagal airs Tuesday at 8 pm

Examine what most Americans consider the Constitution’s most important feature: the Bill of Rights.

Ask Americans what the Constitution’s most important feature is and most will say it’s the guarantees of liberty enshrined in the Bill of Rights. In this episode, Sagal explores the history of the Bill of Rights and addresses several stories — ripped from the headlines — involving freedom of speech, freedom of religion and right to privacy.

"Constitution USA with Peter Sagal, Pt. 2" airs on Tuesday, May 14th at 8:00 p.m. on channel 3 and channel 3-1.

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The Two-Way
9:40 am
Wed April 24, 2013

China Calls Planned U.S.-Japan Drills 'Provocative'

File photo from China's Xinhua News Agency, of one of the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands that are in dispute.
Uncredited Associated Press

China says Japan's decision to participate in joint military exercises with the United States will not dampen its resolve to defend its claim to a disputed island chain that has been a recurring source of tension between the Asian neighbors.

In reference to the joint drills, planned for June, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said "foreign pressure" cannot sway China from protecting its territorial sovereignty in the East China Sea.

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Politics
9:35 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Part 2 of "Eisenhower's Secret War" airs on Tuesday, May 14th at 7 pm

The two-part documentary examines Dwight D. Eisenhower's unwavering commitment — both public and covert — to peaceful co-existence with the USSR in the tumultuous and uneasy Cold War years. The second hour, "Building Weapons, Talking Peace,” recounts President Eisenhower's battles against the Soviet Union in the escalating arms race and examines his peace-keeping efforts. Pictured, Eisenhower visits troops in Korea.

EISENHOWER'S SECRET WAR examines Dwight D. Eisenhower's unwavering commitment — both public and covert — to peaceful co-existence with the USSR in the tumultuous and uneasy Cold War years. Based on recent research by established scholars and writers, the two-part documentary series provides a fresh understanding of how Eisenhower's national security policies and tactics kept a divided world at peace during the 1950s and in the ensuing decades.

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Politics
9:30 am
Wed April 24, 2013

The 68-year history of nuclear weapons on "In My Lifetime" at 9 pm on Monday, May 13th

The Hiroshima Dome in Hiroshima, Japan, which stood virtually at the epicenter of the atomic-bomb explosion on August 6, 1945. The atomic bomb, nicknamed "Little Boy," killed 140,000 either instantly or later as a result of injuries or radiation poisoning. Photo credit: Diane Love. © Whistling Communications.

IN MY LIFETIME thoughtfully and thoroughly examines the 68-year history of nuclear weapons — the most destructive force ever invented. Filmed in Europe, Japan and the U.S., IN MY LIFETIME focuses on the continuing struggle of citizens, scientists and political leaders working to reduce or eliminate the atomic threat, while others search for ways to build nuclear weapons.

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Business
9:25 am
Wed April 24, 2013

10 Buildings that Changed America airs on Sunday, May 12th at 9 pm

Created by architect H.H. Richardson, Trinity was the first example of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, which was later used in churches, city halls and county courthouses across America.

A state capitol that Thomas Jefferson designed to resemble a Roman temple, the home of Henry Ford’s first assembly line, the first indoor regional shopping mall, an airport with a swooping concrete roof that seems to float on air — these are among the buildings surveyed in this cross-country journey to 10 influential works of American architecture. Meet the daring architects who imagined them and learn the shocking, funny and even sad stories of how they came to be. They changed the way we live, work, worship, learn, shop and play. Geoffrey Baer hosts.

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