Europe
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

Grumbling, Excitement Build For London Olympics

The 1948 London Olympics were held when the city, recovering from World War II, was dotted with rubble from Nazi bombardment.
AP

The last time the British did this, they had a king: George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth, was on the throne.

George was so often tongue-tied, yet he proclaimed open the 1948 London Olympics flawlessly.

It was late July. The sun shone down on London from a cloudless sky. The BBC had acquired the TV broadcasting rights for just $4,000 and made the most of them.

People packed Wembley Stadium, eager to forget the horrors of the second world war.

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Science
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

New Silica Rules Languish In Regulatory Black Hole

Controlling dust from activities like this was on the minds of those in the Department of Labor in the 1930s, as silicosis, a lung disease, was taking a toll on American workers. Above, a worker jackhammers into rock in Lassen National Forest in California in 1934, preparing to shoot explosives.
U.S. Forest Service Oregon State University Libraries

Originally published on Wed February 1, 2012 5:50 am

Any job that involves breaking up rock or concrete or brick can potentially expose workers to dangerous silica dust, and last year it looked like the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration was about to put stricter controls in place to limit this health hazard.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

Cystic Fibrosis Drug Wins Approval

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug that can treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis.

The drug, known as Kalydeco, works by helping to fix one defect in the protein that causes the disease.

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Middle East
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

In Booming Istanbul, A Clash Between Old And New

Rapid building in Istanbul is remaking the city, and activists are seeking to preserve historic places. The Haydarpasa train station, which dates to the 19th century, is closing for renovations. But longtime station workers suspect the city will convert the station into a luxury hotel or other commercial property.
Peter Kenyon NPR

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 1:43 pm

On a frigid January morning, bundled-up travelers step off a ferry and scurry toward the imposing stone walls of the Haydarpasa train station, a 19th century landmark in Istanbul, a city full of history.

The people boarding this morning are nostalgic. They're longtime station employees, taking one of the last train runs to Eskesihir, where the station's first director-general is buried.

They're going, as it were, to give him bad news — that Haydarpasa's 150-year service as a public transportation center may be coming to an end.

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Texas Parks & WIldlife on KENW-TV

Texas Parks & Wildlife is a weekly, half-hour program that airs on the PBS stations throughout the Lone Star state, as well as in a number of other public television markets around the country. October 2011 marks our 26th year on PBS.

Each week, our program travels to several different destinations around the state. The stories cover a wide range of topics, from in-depth issues about conservation and the environment, to fun family activities in the outdoors.

Woodturning Workshop on KENW-TV

Woodturning Workshop with Tim Yoder: Woodturning Workshop presents woodturning techniques in a way that is interesting and entertaining to woodturners of all levels of experience.

Middle East
3:20 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

In Israel, A Non-Stop Debate On Possible Iran Strike

Israeli soldiers take part in an exercise at the Shizafon army base, in the Negev Desert north of the southern city of Eilat, on Tuesday. There are growing signs that Israel may be planning a strike against Iran's nuclear facilities.
Jack Guez AFP/Getty Images

In Israel, there is daily speculation over whether Israel will attack Iran's nuclear facilities in the near future. The debate is not only over whether Israel should strike Iran, but what the costs and benefits might be from such a strike.

Israel believes that Iran is working to build a nuclear bomb, and dismisses Iran's assertion that its nuclear program is solely for civilian purposes.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:20 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

A Computer Beats A Pen For Getting Prescriptions Right

A study at two Australian hospitals finds computerized prescribing systems cut errors with drugs.
iStockphoto.com

Drug errors inside hospitals remain a big problem.

By one estimate, 1 in 7 hospitalized patients suffers some form of error in care. Nearly a third of those mistakes are related to drugs. And those mix-ups can lead to longer hospital stays, unnecessary suffering, permanent damage or death.

One way to reduce mistakes is to have doctors enter the prescriptions on a computer instead of with pen and paper. After the switch, hospitals can see error rates drop by a whopping 60 percent.

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It's All Politics
3:09 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

Campaign Finance Reports Show Ups And Downs For Candidates, SuperPACs

A new disclosure report documents how Republican presidential hopeful Rick Perry lost his fundraising base. Donors gave up long before Perry dropped out two weeks ago.

The Texas governor Perry launched his campaign back in August with a gusher of cash from conservative allies, especially in his home state.

He gathered up nearly $7 million in the first three weeks, which turned out to be more than double what he got over the past three months.

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The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

Secret To Being Married 78 Years? Say 'Honey, I Still Love You'

Wilbur Faiss, who's been married more than 78 years.
Fox5Vegas

Originally published on Tue January 31, 2012 2:48 pm

Wilbur and Theresa Faiss of Las Vegas have been married for more than 78 years — an accomplishment that's generating headlines this week about them being the nation's "longest-married couple."

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