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Planet Money
1:04 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

The Fed Goes Big

Any questions?
Jim Watson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 4:06 pm

What people think is going to happen to the economy has a huge influence over what actually happens. If you can change peoples' expectations, you can change the world.

The Federal Reserve knows this. And, as Robert Smith pointed out this morning, Ben Bernanke and the Fed have been using the power of expectations more and more in recent years.

This afternoon, the Fed took another huge step in this direction.

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Education
12:39 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

What's At Stake For U.S. Teachers

Chicago Teachers Union members picket the CPS headquarters in Chicago on Thursday, the fourth day of their strike.
John Gress Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 2:46 pm

The intractable issues that led to the teachers' strike in Chicago are being argued about in states and school districts across the country.

The past decade has been a time of enormous ferment in education policy, with numerous new ideas and approaches being promoted by everyone from conservative think tanks to the well-heeled Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Obama administration officials.

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

'All That's Great About America': Nation Bids Neil Armstrong Farewell

Members of the congregation stand at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington during the national memorial service for the first man to walk on the moon, Neil Armstrong.
Ann Heisenfelt AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 9:19 pm

Hundreds packed the Washington National Cathedral today to pay their respects to Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon.

Perhaps the most amazing tribute came from Eugene Cernan, the man who followed in Armstrong's footsteps and became the last man to walk on the moon during the 1972 Apollo 17 mission.

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Welcome To The New Middle East

Security guards were deployed outside the graffiti-covered walls of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt, which came under attack Tuesday.
Mohamed Abd El Ghany Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 1:56 pm

The three attacks on U.S. diplomatic missions this week have a common theme: all took place in countries where autocratic rulers were ousted last year and where new governments are still struggling to keep order.

Last year, many Americans were cheering on Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt, Libya and Yemen. Now the U.S. is the focus of violent anger over an anti-Islamic film produced in this country.

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Africa
11:29 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Gorillas And Guerrillas Share The Troubled Congo

Patrick Karabaranga, a warden at the Virunga National Park, plays with an orphaned mountain gorilla at the park headquarters in Rumangabo, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, on July 17. The Virunga park is home to about 200 mountain gorillas, approximately a quarter of the world's population.
Phil Moore AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 9:19 pm

When crossing from Uganda into Congo at the shabby border town of Bunagana, I encountered a broadly smiling man in a black leather jacket named Hamid Kashaisha.

He asked if I wanted to see the gorillas. I replied that it's guerrillas — with guns, that is — that I wanted to see: the M23 rebels who, for the past two months, had occupied a piece of real estate in eastern Congo larger than Delaware.

That was no deterrence to the pitchman.

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