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10:07 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Tweeting From A Conflict Zone: Does It Help Or Hurt News Reporting?

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 12:03 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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News
10:07 am
Tue July 22, 2014

For Pregnant Women, New Guidelines Aim To Reduce Workplace Discrimination

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 12:03 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
8:37 am
Tue July 22, 2014

U.S. Appeals Courts Issue Conflicting Decisions On Obamacare Subsidies

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 12:03 pm

A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday dealt a significant blow to the Affordable Care Act, when it threw out an IRS regulation that governs subsidies. But before the ink dried on that decision, another three-judge panel hearing a similar case issued a decision that was completely opposite.

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Tue July 22, 2014

U.K. Orders New Inquiry Into Ex-KGB Spy Litvinenko's Death

Marina Litvinenko, the widow of former Russian intelligence officer Alexander Litvinenko, says she is "relieved and delighted" with the U.K. government's decision to open a public inquiry into the former KGB agent's death in 2006 by radiation poisoning.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:12 pm

Britain has ordered a public inquiry into the death in 2006 of former KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko by radiation poisoning.

In a statement to Parliament today, Home Secretary Theresa May said the independent Home Office inquiry will be headed by Robert Owen, a senior judge who is the coroner in the inquest into Litvinenko's death. She said the inquiry would, among other things, identify "where responsibility for the death lies."

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Shots - Health News
7:43 am
Tue July 22, 2014

States Experiment With Health Savings Accounts For Medicaid

Topp Yimgrimm/iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:19 am

If all goes according to plan, next year many Arkansas Medicaid beneficiaries will be required to make monthly contributions to so-called Health Independence Accounts. Those who don't may have to pay more of the cost of their medical services, and in some cases may be refused services.

Supporters say it will help nudge Medicaid beneficiaries toward becoming more cost-conscious health care consumers. Patient advocates are skeptical, pointing to studies showing that such financial "skin-in-the-game" requirements discourage low-income people from getting care that they need.

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