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It's All Politics
8:06 am
Tue March 20, 2012

3 Things To Watch For In Illinois

Mitt Romney talks with students March 19, 2012 at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 5:30 am

By the time Republican primary season got around to Illinois in past election cycles, the Land of Lincoln was pretty much an afterthought since the party's nominee had already been decided. Not this time.

Mitt Romney has what seems like an insurmountable lead in delegates. But there are questions as to whether he can reach the 1,144 needed for the nomination by the party's August convention. And with his rivals, especially Rick Santorum, refusing to exit the race, the GOP primaries have entered the grind-it-out-for-every-delegate phase.

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Opinion
8:06 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Foreign Policy: Help Wanted

A car drives by a "now hiring" sign that is posted outside of the soon-to-be-open Marin Ace Hardware store on Nov. 30, 2011 in San Rafael, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 6:35 am

Byron Auguste is a director of McKinsey & Company based in Washington, D.C. Susan Lund is research director of the McKinsey Global Institute, based in Washington, D.C. James Manyika is a director of the McKinsey Global Institute based in San Francisco.

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Mountain Stage
8:06 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Fitz And The Tantrums On Mountain Stage

Fitz and the Tantrums.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 7:00 am

Neo-soul and indie-pop ensemble Fitz and the Tantrums make their first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live in Charleston, W.Va.

It's no exaggeration to say that Fitz and the Tantrums have been one of the hottest groups of the past two years. Their breakthrough release Pickin' Up the Pieces earned them repeated appearances on late night television, and they've spent countless days on the road, playing to sold-out crowds in nearly every major American city.

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Opinion
8:06 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Weekly Standard: Without Precedent

A Jan. 18, 2011 photo of Ken Hoagland, Chairman of "repeal it now (dot) org" makes remarks during a press conference to receive petitions calling for repeal of Obamacare on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 7:04 am

Adam J. White is a lawyer in Washington, D.C.

Ordinarily, judges decide cases by applying the text of laws and the precedents laid down in previous cases. But the Supreme Court is no ordinary court, and the cases that it chooses to decide are not ordinary ones. Cases in which the lower courts disagree; cases of utmost national importance; cases for which there is little precedent or the written law is ambiguous​ — ​this is the Supreme Court's daily fare.

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Opinion
8:05 am
Tue March 20, 2012

New Republic: The Case Of The Century?

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks during an event to mark the 90-day anniversary of the signing of the Affordable Care Act June 22, 2010 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 7:05 am

Jonathan Cohn is senior editor at The New Republic.

Next week the Supreme Court hears oral arguments in the lawsuits challenging the Affordable Care Act. But is it really the "case of the century," as pundits have started calling it?

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