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Poetry
9:18 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Press-Play Poetry: 'Failing And Flying'

Alexander Chernyakov iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 9:27 am

Some poetry is meant to be heard as well as read. Press-Play Poetry is an occasional series that celebrates the power of the voice to bring lines on a page to life.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Opinion
9:17 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Weekly Standard: The Businessman Vs. The Professor

New England Patiots owner Bob Kraft and Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney talk as the Boston Red Sox take on the Tampa Bay Rays April 16, 2012 at Fenway Park in Boston, Ma.
Elsa Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 7:44 am

James W. Ceaser is professor of politics at the University of Virginia and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

With the Republican nomination now settled, electoral analysts are rolling out their models of voter behavior to predict the outcome of the general election. These "scientific" efforts at prophecy, which have become increasingly elaborate and arcane, boil down in the end to gauging voters' evaluations of three simple questions for each candidate: What have you done? What will you do? and Who are you?

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Opinion
9:17 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Foreign Policy: Why Do They Hate Us?

A woman speaks as Egyptians gather in Tahrir Square to mark the one year anniversary of the revolution on Jan.25, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt.
Jeff J. Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 7:56 am

Mona Eltahawy is an Egyptian-American columnist. In November 2011, Egyptian police beat her, breaking her left arm and right hand, and sexually assaulted her. She was detained by the Interior Ministry and military intelligence for 12 hours.

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Opinion
9:16 am
Tue April 24, 2012

The Nation: Media Favors Horserace Over Issues

U.S. President Barack Obama arrives to speak about the oil markets in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 17, 2012 in Washington, D.C.
Pete Marovich Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 7:18 am

Ari Melber writes for The Nation.

For all the griping about media bias in politics, good data is in short supply. Every four years, however, the nonpartisan Pew Research Center releases exhaustive, quantitative reports on how the press covers the presidential campaign. Their new report shows that the largest bias this year did not favor an ideology or candidate — though Santorum never got much love — but favored the coverage of the horserace and personal issues over public policy.

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Tue April 24, 2012

Consumer Confidence Held Steady This Month

After a slight decline in March, the widely watched consumer confidence index from the private Conference Board "was virtually unchanged in April," the research group reports.

"The index now stands at 69.2, down slightly from 69.5 in March," it says.

"Overall, consumers are more upbeat about the state of the economy, but they remain cautiously optimistic," Lynn Franco, director of the board's consumer research center, adds in its release.

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