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It's All Politics
4:21 am
Wed February 1, 2012

Romney Rules In First Mega-State But Warning Flags Fly Over Florida Results

Mitt Romney at his state campaign headquarters Tuesday in Tampa, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

It was a great night for Mitt Romney, restoring the former Massachusetts governor's lead in the race for the Republican presidential nomination.

Storming from behind after his crashing fall in South Carolina 10 days earlier, Romney overtook rival Newt Gingrich and passed him in the course of a week. In the end, he won the far larger and more pivotal state of Florida by the same margin he had lost by in South Carolina.

He did it in two ways, both depending on the power of TV in a state too large for retail campaigning.

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Middle East
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

In Booming Istanbul, A Clash Between Old And New

Rapid building in Istanbul is remaking the city, and activists are seeking to preserve historic places. The Haydarpasa train station, which dates to the 19th century, is closing for renovations. But longtime station workers suspect the city will convert the station into a luxury hotel or other commercial property.
Peter Kenyon NPR

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 1:43 pm

On a frigid January morning, bundled-up travelers step off a ferry and scurry toward the imposing stone walls of the Haydarpasa train station, a 19th century landmark in Istanbul, a city full of history.

The people boarding this morning are nostalgic. They're longtime station employees, taking one of the last train runs to Eskesihir, where the station's first director-general is buried.

They're going, as it were, to give him bad news — that Haydarpasa's 150-year service as a public transportation center may be coming to an end.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

Cystic Fibrosis Drug Wins Approval

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug that can treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis.

The drug, known as Kalydeco, works by helping to fix one defect in the protein that causes the disease.

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Science
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

New Silica Rules Languish In Regulatory Black Hole

Controlling dust from activities like this was on the minds of those in the Department of Labor in the 1930s, as silicosis, a lung disease, was taking a toll on American workers. Above, a worker jackhammers into rock in Lassen National Forest in California in 1934, preparing to shoot explosives.
U.S. Forest Service Oregon State University Libraries

Originally published on Wed February 1, 2012 5:50 am

Any job that involves breaking up rock or concrete or brick can potentially expose workers to dangerous silica dust, and last year it looked like the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration was about to put stricter controls in place to limit this health hazard.

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Europe
10:01 pm
Tue January 31, 2012

Grumbling, Excitement Build For London Olympics

The 1948 London Olympics were held when the city, recovering from World War II, was dotted with rubble from Nazi bombardment.
AP

The last time the British did this, they had a king: George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth, was on the throne.

George was so often tongue-tied, yet he proclaimed open the 1948 London Olympics flawlessly.

It was late July. The sun shone down on London from a cloudless sky. The BBC had acquired the TV broadcasting rights for just $4,000 and made the most of them.

People packed Wembley Stadium, eager to forget the horrors of the second world war.

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