Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn official base is Jakarta, Indonesia, where he opened NPR's first bureau in that country in 2010. From there, he has covered Southeast Asia, and the gamut of natural and human diversity stretching from Myanmar to Fiji and Vietnam to Tasmania. During 2013-2014, he is covering Beijing, China, as NPR's Louisa Lim is on fellowship.

Prior to Jakarta, Kuhn spent five years based in Beijing as a NPR foreign correspondent reporting on China and Northeast Asia. In that time Kuhn covered stories including the effect of China's resurgence on rest of the world, diplomacy and the environment, the ancient cultural traditions that still exert a profound influence in today's China, and the people's quest for social justice in a period of rapid modernization and uneven development. His beat also included such diverse topics as popular theater in Japan and the New York Philharmonic's 2008 musical diplomacy tour to Pyongyang, North Korea.

In 2004-2005, Kuhn was based in London for NPR. He covered stories ranging from the 2005 terrorist attacks on London's transport system to the wedding of Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles. In the spring of 2005, he reported from Iraq on the formation of the post-election interim government.

Kuhn began contributing reports to NPR from China in 1996. During that time, he also worked as an accredited freelance reporter with the Los Angeles Times, and as Beijing correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review.

In what felt to him a previous incarnation, Kuhn once lived on Manhattan's Lower East Side and walked down Broadway to work in Chinatown as a social worker. He majored in French literature at Washington University in St. Louis. He gravitated to China in the early 1980s, studying first at the Beijing Foreign Languages Institute and later at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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Parallels
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

After Losing An Only Child, Chinese Parents Face Old Age Alone

A man looks at the painting Better To Have Only One Child at the China National Art Museum in Beijing. More than three decades after China's one-child policy took hold, some bereaved parents are suffering an unintended consequence of the policy: The loss of a child leaves them with no support in their old age.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

It's been nearly 3 1/2 decades since China's government started limiting most urban families to one child. The family planning policy successfully slowed the nation's population growth, but it has had some unintended consequences.

One is that some parents lose their only children to illness or accidents and end up with no one to care for them in their old age. Now, these parents have gotten together to demand their rights.

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Asia
2:10 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Marchers Take To Streets Of Hong Kong To Protest Eroding Autonomy

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Asia
1:22 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Clock Is Ticking For Aung San Suu Kyi's Presidential Bid

Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks during a public rally in Yangon, Myanmar, on May 17. Democracy activists joined Suu Kyi to call for an amendment to Myanmar's constitution, a move she says is necessary if next year's general elections are to be free and fair.
Gemunu Amarasinghe AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:31 am

Time is running out for Myanmar's opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, in her bid to become president.

The long-serving political prisoner and democracy activist is now 67. If she wins general elections next year, she could become Asia's most famous politician.

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Asia
2:18 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

In Rift Over Interfaith Ban, A New Fault Line For Burmese Politics

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

Myanmar's parliament is now considering a bill that would restrict marriages of people from different religions. Buddhist nationalists hope it will protect their religion from the spread of Islam and claim it's a way to prevent coerced conversions, but critics lambaste the proposed law as targeting the country's Muslim minority.

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Asia
2:08 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Chinese Authorities Ensure Tiananmen Anniversary Passes Quietly

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

25 years ago today, these were some of the sounds from Tiananmen Square, as Chinese soldiers used rifles and tanks to end nearly two months of pro-democracy protests.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTESTS)

CORNISH: Hundreds are believed to have died. The White House released a statement today in honor of those who gave their lives, saying we call on Chinese authorities to account for those killed, detained or missing in connection with the events surrounding June 4, 1989.

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