Corey Dade

Corey Dade is a national correspondent for the NPR Digital News team. With more than 15 years of journalism experience, he writes news analysis about federal policy, national politics, social trends, cultural issues and other topics for NPR.org.

Prior to NPR, Dade served as the Atlanta-based southern politics and economics reporter at The Wall Street Journal for five years. During that time he covered many of the nation's biggest news stories, including the BP oil spill, the Tiger Woods scandal and the 2008 presidential election, having traveled with the Obama and McCain campaigns. He also covered the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings and Hurricane Katrina, which led to a nine-month special assignment in New Orleans.

At the Journal, Dade also told the stories at the intersection of politics, culture and commerce, such as the Obama presidency's potential to reframe race in America and the battle between African-American and Dominican hair salons for control of the billion-dollar black consumer market.

Dade began his reporting career at The Miami Herald, writing about curbside newspaper racks and other controversies roiling the retirement town of Hallandale, Fla., pop. 30,000. He later covered local and state politics at the Detroit Free Press, The Boston Globe and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

No stranger to radio, over the years Dade has been a frequent guest commentator and analyst on NPR news, talk and information programs and on several cable TV networks.

As a student at Grambling State University in Louisiana, Dade played football for legendary coach Eddie Robinson. He then transferred to his eventual alma mater, the University of Maryland.

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News
11:48 am
Wed February 22, 2012

What's Driving The Backlash Against Traffic Cameras

Across the country, fed up drivers are fighting back against traffic cameras that target motorists who speed or run red lights. In Los Angeles, technician Charles Riggings services a traffic camera in 2010.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Have you ever opened your mail and found a traffic ticket sticking you with a not-so-small fine? If so, your reaction might well have been, "What the [expletive]?"

Then maybe you looked carefully at the enclosed photo and realized the vehicle shown (allegedly) running a red light or speeding was, in fact, yours.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Wed February 15, 2012

U.S. Agrees To $350,000 Settlement In Conn. Immigration Raid Cases

Advocates on all sides of the immigration debate are digesting the latest big, and perhaps historic, development: The U.S. government agreed to pay a $350,000 settlement to 11 Connecticut men arrested in raids in 2007.

The plaintiffs claimed immigration agents violated their rights during the early morning raids, which snared nearly three dozen people.

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It's All Politics
3:05 pm
Thu February 9, 2012

At CPAC, Hard Lines On Race And Immigration Could Be Awkward

A note to the Republican presidential candidates heading to Washington for the Conservative Political Action Conference: some of the events could make you uncomfortable if you're planning to tack to the center in your general election campaign.

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It's All Politics
3:59 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

South Carolina Sues Justice Department For Blocking Its Voter ID Law

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks last month in Columbia, S.C. The state is now suing Holder over the Justice Department's decision to reject its new voter ID law.
Mary Ann Chastain AP

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 4:46 pm

In the escalating fight over voter identification laws, South Carolina has filed a federal lawsuit to overturn a Justice Department decision blocking the state's new photo ID requirement.

South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson, representing his state in the case, said in the complaint filed Tuesday that the law "will not disenfranchise any potential South Carolina voter," as the Justice Department contends.

The lawsuit further argues:

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It's All Politics
1:19 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

Indiana's Top Election Official Convicted of Voter Fraud

The New England Patriots weren't the only losers on Super Bowl weekend in Indiana.

With much of the world focused on Indianapolis hosting the big game, a local jury on Saturday convicted Indiana Secretary of State Charlie White on six felony counts, including theft and voter fraud — a crime he was supposed to prevent as the state's top election official.

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