Hansi Lo Wang

Hansi Lo Wang is a reporter covering race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's new Code Switch team.

Based in Washington, D.C., he previously served as a production assistant for NPR's Weekend Edition and was awarded the NPR Kroc Fellowship, during which he reported for NPR's National Desk and Seattle public radio station KUOW.

A Philadelphia native, Wang founded a radio reporting program for high school students in Philadelphia's Chinatown in 2008. He has also worked as a refugee housing coordinator.

He graduated with a bachelor's degree in political science from Swarthmore College. As a student, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly, student-run program on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a native Chinese speaker of both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects.

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The Deadly Tornado In Moore, Okla.
5:57 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Tornado's Survival Rate 'Not Just Luck,' Meteorologist Says

Marc Austin monitors radar and issues warnings at the National Weather Center in Norman, Okla., on Thursday.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:58 am

Monday's tornado in Moore, Okla., killed 24 people and caused an estimated $2.2 billion worth of damage. As the community reflects on what happened, one question is: How did so many manage to survive such devastating destruction?

Lifelong Oklahoman Kristi Freeman has seen her share of tornadoes, but she says the twister that tore through her neighborhood Monday was something else.

"This tornado was like a monster. It was like something that was alive. It destroyed your peace, your comfort," she says.

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Code Switch
1:40 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Immigrants To Be Largest Driver Of U.S. Population Growth

Immigrants take the U.S. oath of citizenship during a naturalization ceremony in Irving, Texas.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 7:56 am

New immigrants will be the main driver of population growth in the U.S. by as early as 2027, according to new Census Bureau projections.

This would be the first time in almost two centuries that new births will not be the largest source of U.S. population growth.

The Census Bureau says its projections show a combination of declining fertility rates, aging baby boomers and ongoing immigration to the United States.

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Education
2:49 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Latino High School Grads Enter College At Record Rate

Jackeline Lizama (front) plans to attend a local community college after she graduates next month from her high school in Silver Spring, Md.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 3:46 pm

If the headline caught your eye, here's more good news.

Seven in 10 Latino high school graduates in the class of 2012 went to college, according to a recent report by the Pew Hispanic Center.

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Code Switch
2:49 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Bollywood's Early Roots In A Silent Film

Dhundiraj Govind Phalke (left), known as the father of Indian cinema, examines a filmstrip.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 8:35 am

Film festivals around the world are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Indian films this year.

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Code Switch
1:33 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Home Sweet Home Costs More For Blacks And Latinos

A "sold" sign is posted outside a home in Carmel, Ind. Black and Latino homebuyers pay about 3.5 percent more for housing than whites and Asians, according to a study released this week by Duke University.
Michael Conroy AP

Black and Latino homebuyers pay more for housing than whites and Asians, according to a study released this week by Duke University. The price difference is about 3.5 percent.

That may not sound like a lot. But Patrick Bayer, a Duke economics professor who led the study, says when you do the math, that percentage can translate to about $5,000 or $10,000 per housing sale.

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