Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen continues to leave the door open for an interest rate hike in December, though she says that once rates start to rise, it will be "very gradual."

Testifying before the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday, Yellen said the economy is "performing well," with solid growth in domestic spending.

Video-game publisher Activision Blizzard Inc. is taking a big step into the mobile world, acquiring King Digital Entertainment, the maker of Candy Crush games, for $5.9 billion.

The deal will create the second biggest game company in the world, after Tencent, says the research firm Newzoo. It will have some 500 million active monthly users around the world.

U.S. Navy investigators have found the wreckage of the cargo ship El Faro, which sank off the Bahamas during Hurricane Joaquin with 33 people aboard, the National Transportation Safety Board has confirmed.

The U.S.-flagged ship was located after a week of searching by a crew from U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command, using sonar equipment. It appears to be in an upright position and in one piece at a depth of about 15,000 feet.

China unveiled its first passenger jet Monday, part of an effort to compete in the lucrative commercial aircraft business now dominated by Boeing and Airbus.

The single-aisle, twin-engine C919 was developed by the state-run Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China, or Comac. The jet was shown to a large crowd of government dignitaries in a hangar at an assembly plant outside Shanghai, near Pudong International Airport.

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